2017 04 << 12345678910111213141516171819202122232425262728293031>> 2017 06

TALL ROUND BAR TABLE - TALL ROUND


TALL ROUND BAR TABLE - BUY KITCHEN TABLES.



Tall Round Bar Table





tall round bar table






    bar table
  • A bar table is a table in a common law courtroom at which advocates sit or stand . It is generally situated between the Bench and the well of the court, where the public sit. Advocates such as barristers sit facing the Bench with their backs to the well.

  • A long table near the front of the courtroom where lawyers stand when they are addressing the court and sit when others are addressing the court.





    round
  • Pass and go around (something) so as to move on in a changed direction

  • Alter (a number) to one less exact but more convenient for calculations

  • from beginning to end; throughout; "It rains all year round on Skye"; "frigid weather the year around"

  • a charge of ammunition for a single shot

  • Give a round shape to

  • wind around; move along a circular course; "round the bend"





    tall
  • Used in reference to proud and confident movement or behavior

  • a garment size for a tall person

  • Of great or more than average height, esp. (with reference to an object) relative to width

  • (after a measurement and in questions) Measuring a specified distance from top to bottom

  • grandiloquent: lofty in style; "he engages in so much tall talk, one never really realizes what he is saying"

  • great in vertical dimension; high in stature; "tall people"; "tall buildings"; "tall trees"; "tall ships"











St. Monica's Church




St. Monica's Church





Jamaica, Queens, New York City, New York, United States

Built in 1856-57 Saint Monica's Roman Catholic Church was constructed by roaster mason Anders Peterson under the supervision of the Reverend Anthony Farley. Marked by its distinctive central campanile, a feature reminiscent of the Romanesque architecture of northern Italy, Saint Monica's is one of the earliest surviving examples of Early Romanesque Revival architecture in New York, and one of the only Roman Catholic Churches in the city executed in this style.

At the beginning of the 19th century the Roman Catholic Church of America included about 50 priests, 50 churches and a congregation of 100,000 members. Since Maryland was the only one of the thirteen original colonies to tolerate Catholicism, Baltimore was the chosen seat for the first American bishop who was appointed in 1789.

By 1808 the growth of the new nation had attracted many more European Catholics, and New York was made one of four new Catholic dioceses.

From the three churches in New York City the priests journeyed by horse and boat to the Catholics throughout the neighboring countryside. Finally in 1822 St. Paul's church was built in Brooklyn, and it shared the duties of ministering to the out-missions.

By 1838 Jamaica had acquired a sizeable Irish Catholic population. Many of the large farms employed Irish laborers, and the construction of the Long Island Railroad along Jamaica Avenue in the 1830s brought an increasing number of Irish workers to the area.

In October of 1838 Father Michael Curran of Harlem offered the first Mass to about 200 area Catholics in the home of John McLaughlin, a blacksmith. Within a few months of this first gathering, the village of Jamaica became an out-mission of St. Paul's in Brooklyn.

Recognizing the needs of the Catholics in Jamaica, St. Paul's priest, Father Richard Waters began a campaign in June of 1839 to collect money for the establishment of a church. A newspaper notice stated their case:

The Catholics of Jamaica, L.I., respectfully inform their brethren in New York, Brooklyn and elsewhere, that they are gathering subscriptions for the erection of a Catholic Church-in Washington St., Jamaica, as the inconvenience of being without a place of worship is severely felt by the Catholic population of that neighborhood as well as by casual residents and visitors.

In July of 1839 the Augustine priest Janes O'Donnell succeeded Father Waters and continued the project at Jamaica. Land was secured, not far from the present church site and on June 2, 1840, a small frame church was dedicated to Monica, the mother of Saint Augustine. When a resident-pastor was finally secured in 1848, St. Monica's established out-missions of its own at Flushing, Southold, Westbury, Cold Spring and Far Rockaway.

Between 1841 and 1850 crop failures in Ireland prompted the arrival of nearly 100,000 Catholic immigrants to the United States. A large proportion of these people settled in New York and as a result of the increasing importance of the diocese , it was elevated to an archdiocese. Under New York's nationally prominent archbishop, John Hughes,a substantial building program was initiated. Besides the architectural master pice of St. Patricks' Cathedral in Manhattan, Hughes left an archdiocese of 150 priests, 35 churches, 3 colleges, 50 schools and over 400,000 parishioners when he died in 1864.

One of these churches was a new brick structure designed in the Early Romanesque Revival style for St. Monica's in Jamaica.

In 1854 at the age of 40, Father Anthony Farley, who was bom in County Cavan, Ireland, began his influential term as pastor of St. Monica's. Arriving in this country at the age of six, Farley studied in Montreal and received his religious training at the College and Seminary of St. Vincent de Paul in Jefferson County, New York.

Upon his arrival at St. Monica's, Farley began plans for the construction of a new church on five lots of land on Washington Street (new 160th Street) . Four of these lots, near the old frame church, were given to the church by a French woman from New York and Farley purchased the fifth.

The priest selected Jamaica master mason Anders Peterson, a Dane who also owned a local grist mill, as contractor. Peterson figures prominently in contemporary building history of the area and was also responsible for the fine masonry of the First Reformed Church (1861-63) and of Grace Episcopal Church (1861-63).

Some accounts suggest that Farley produced the design for the church but until more definite proof can be found, we must assume he only supervised the work.

The corner stone of the building was laid in 1856 and on August 15, 1857, Bishop Loughlin, the first Bishop of Brooklyn, presided over the dedication of the church.

Father Anthony Farley was a strong leader within the Jamaica community as well as within his church. He was a friend of ex-Governor John A. King and was a scholar of French Catholic writing. He especially a











St. Monica's Church




St. Monica's Church





Jamaica, Queens, New York City, New York, United States

Built in 1856-57 Saint Monica's Roman Catholic Church was constructed by master mason Anders Peterson under the supervision of the Reverend Anthony Farley. Marked by its distinctive central campanile, a feature reminiscent of the Romanesque architecture of northern Italy, Saint Monica's is one of the earliest surviving examples of Early Romanesque Revival architecture in New York, and one of the only Roman Catholic Churches in the city executed in this style.

At the beginning of the 19th century the Roman Catholic Church of America included about 50 priests, 50 churches and a congregation of 100,000 members. Since Maryland was the only one of the thirteen original colonies to tolerate Catholicism, Baltimore was the chosen seat for the first American bishop who was appointed in 1789.

By 1808 the growth of the new nation had attracted many more European Catholics, and New York was made one of four new Catholic dioceses.

From the three churches in New York City the priests journeyed by horse and boat to the Catholics throughout the neighboring countryside. Finally in 1822 St. Paul's church was built in Brooklyn, and it shared the duties of ministering to the out-missions.

By 1838 Jamaica had acquired a sizeable Irish Catholic population. Many of the large farms employed Irish laborers, and the construction of the Long Island Railroad along Jamaica Avenue in the 1830s brought an increasing number of Irish workers to the area.

In October of 1838 Father Michael Curran of Harlem offered the first Mass to about 200 area Catholics in the home of John McLaughlin, a blacksmith. Within a few months of this first gathering, the village of Jamaica became an out-mission of St. Paul's in Brooklyn.

Recognizing the needs of the Catholics in Jamaica, St. Paul's priest, Father Richard Waters began a campaign in June of 1839 to collect money for the establishment of a church. A newspaper notice stated their case:

The Catholics of Jamaica, L.I., respectfully inform their brethren in New York, Brooklyn and elsewhere, that they are gathering subscriptions for the erection of a Catholic Church-in Washington St., Jamaica, as the inconvenience of being without a place of worship is severely felt by the Catholic population of that neighborhood as well as by casual residents and visitors.

In July of 1839 the Augustine priest Janes O'Donnell succeeded Father Waters and continued the project at Jamaica. Land was secured, not far from the present church site and on June 2, 1840, a small frame church was dedicated to Monica, the mother of Saint Augustine. When a resident-pastor was finally secured in 1848, St. Monica's established out-missions of its own at Flushing, Southold, Westbury, Cold Spring and Far Rockaway.

Between 1841 and 1850 crop failures in Ireland prompted the arrival of nearly 100,000 Catholic immigrants to the United States. A large proportion of these people settled in New York and as a result of the increasing importance of the diocese , it was elevated to an archdiocese. Under New York's nationally prominent archbishop, John Hughes,a substantial building program was initiated. Besides the architectural master pice of St. Patricks' Cathedral in Manhattan, Hughes left an archdiocese of 150 priests, 35 churches, 3 colleges, 50 schools and over 400,000 parishioners when he died in 1864.

One of these churches was a new brick structure designed in the Early Romanesque Revival style for St. Monica's in Jamaica.

In 1854 at the age of 40, Father Anthony Farley, who was bom in County Cavan, Ireland, began his influential term as pastor of St. Monica's. Arriving in this country at the age of six, Farley studied in Montreal and received his religious training at the College and Seminary of St. Vincent de Paul in Jefferson County, New York.

Upon his arrival at St. Monica's, Farley began plans for the construction of a new church on five lots of land on Washington Street (new 160th Street) . Four of these lots, near the old frame church, were given to the church by a French woman from New York and Farley purchased the fifth.

The priest selected Jamaica master mason Anders Peterson, a Dane who also owned a local grist mill, as contractor. Peterson figures prominently in contemporary building history of the area and was also responsible for the fine masonry of the First Reformed Church (1861-63) and of Grace Episcopal Church (1861-63).

Some accounts suggest that Farley produced the design for the church but until more definite proof can be found, we must assume he only supervised the work.

The corner stone of the building was laid in 1856 and on August 15, 1857, Bishop Loughlin, the first Bishop of Brooklyn, presided over the dedication of the church.

Father Anthony Farley was a strong leader within the Jamaica community as well as within his church. He was a friend of ex-Governor John A. King and was a scholar of French Catholic writing. He especially ad









tall round bar table







Similar posts:

glass table centerpiece

custom glass table tops

console console furniture table

entryway console table

small white accent table

antique pine drop leaf table

cherry wood dining room tables

black and chrome pub table

circular pedestal table



2011..17 Category: None comment0 trackback0

comment

post comment

  • comment
  • secret
  • Only the blog author may view the comment.

trackback

trackbackURL:http://42rounddiningtayn.blog.fc2.com/tb.php/3-7c3650c1

Profile

42 round dining table

Author:42 round dining table
Welcome to FC2!

Latest comments

Latest trackbacks

Monthly archive

Search form